Bell’s palsy and Dry Eye

Bell’s palsy is a temporary facial paralysis often due to damage or trauma to facial nerves. Symptoms may include twitching, weakness, drooping eyelid or corner of the mouth, drooling, and dry eye or mouth.bell's palsy

The causes of this condition are not known but we think it may be due to a viral infection that can cause swelling around the facial nerves. Risk factors for Bell’s palsy include diabetes, pregnancy and Lyme disease. Bell’s palsy disease usually occurs suddenly, affecting one side of the face.In many cases, the paralysis will go away on their own within a few weeks. Steroids may be prescribed to reduce inflammation and swelling. Generally, the prognosis for Bell’s palsy is good. Symptoms usually dissipate within 2 weeks of onset and full recovery occurs within 3 to 6 months. Bell’s palsy may appear similar to a stroke but no other neurological signs are present.

Bell’s Palsy Affect Eyes

It is very difficult, most like impossible to blink on the affected side of the face where the paralysis occured. The lower eyelid of the affected may become droopy as well as the lips. The person has no control on their muscles function on the affected side.

By not being able to blink or close your eyelids, people with Bell’s palsy suffer from dry eye syndrome. Blinking is so important to contribute to lubrication of the eyes.

Bell’s Palsy Treatment vs Dry Eyes

As we know know, Bell’s Palsy paralysis can have a serious impact on eye health since it can lead to a very severe dry eye syndrome. To overcome that problem, you will need to use ocular lubricants and eye ointments (NO PRESERVATIVES). You can also shield your affected eye with an eyelid patch or a moisture retention eyeshield mask. Use moisture retention patches during the day and especially at night while sleeping. If you do not take care of your dry eye problem, even if you recover from the disease, you may be have permanent consequences such as corneal ulceration and scarring of the ocular surface.